Call for Presentations

We are pleased to announce that the next Annual Meeting of the Northern California Technical Processes Group (NCTPG) will take place in San Francisco late April/early May 2017.

This year will be our past-present-future80th and NCTPG wants to mark the past, present, and future of technical services by examining what it takes to navigate the evolution of our work. Technology changes but the need to manage change does not.

What changes have you experienced? How did you manage the technological and interpersonal challenges? If you have a topic that you believe fits our 2017 theme of managing change, we’d love to hear about it. Presentations are usually 20-30 minutes with additional participation in a panel discussion.

Please submit your proposal to the NCTPG steering committee with the subject “2017 Call for Presentations” at nctpg1@gmail.com.

Possible topics include:

  • the hard and soft skills necessary to manage change and expectations
  • the changing roles of librarians and technical services
  • systems migrations
  • preparing LIS students, employees, and systems for future changes, like Linked Data
  • outsourcing

Deadline for submission: Wednesday 16 November.

NCTPG tours the Tenderloin

After the NCTPG 2016 Annual Meeting, several attendees joined tours of neighborhood memory institutions. The Tenderloin Museum offers a walking tour Tuesday through Saturday at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Bill Fricker, executive director, graciously arranged our tour with Pamela, local resident and expert in Tenderloin history. One attendee said, “The Tenderloin Museum and tour was extremely profound.” We highly recommend planning a visit!
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2016 Annual Meeting Recap

Our 79th NCTPG Annual Meeting encompassed the theme of Beyond Books: Capturing the Unique in Community Collections. Our speakers presented successes and pitfalls in creating spaces for communities to preserve their heritage and contemporary voices. They  warned against complacency both in trusting technology and not questioning the librarian/archivist’s role in the process.

All presentation slides on Slideshare


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NCTPG 2016 Annual Meeting

Beyond Books: Capturing the Unique in Community Collections

79th NCTPG Annual Meeting

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Friday, May 6, 2016

 San Francisco Public Library Koret Auditorium

Perhaps they are hidden in a storeroom or stacked on your desk awaiting attention. Sometimes they are held by communities which lack the resources to preserve and disseminate their materials. Audio, video, physical objects, and ephemeral print materials often do not fit into normal technical processing workflows. This year’s NCTPG Annual Meeting covers collections of non-traditional materials, including their acquisition, metadata, digitization, and preservation. How do we open up hidden and community collections and make them more accessible? What are the possibilities for collaboration with experts outside our institutions, other institutions, and the members of the communities we serve? How can we honor local perspectives and capture their unique voice in the collections we create and preserve?

This year’s speakers:

Program

Register online
to start or renew your membership and attend the Annual Meeting. $35 in advance, $40 at the door.

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Save the date! NCTPG Annual Meeting Friday, May 6, 2016

The Northern California Technical Processes Group (NCTPG) is pleased to announce that its 79th Annual Meeting will take place in the San Francisco Public Library’s Koret Auditorium on Friday, May 6, 2016 from 9:30 to 1:00.

The presenters will be:
Rick Prelinger, Prelinger Archives
Al Bersch, Oakland Museum of California
Michelle Krasowski, Internet Archive
Geoffrey Skinner and Jon Haupt, Sonoma County Library

Please mark your calendars. Further details will be coming soon.

2015 Annual Meeting recap

A great round of applause and much gratitude to our illuminating and entertaining speakers! This year, we took a look at the supply side of technical services: Where does the metadata for our resources come from? How can vendors and libraries work together to improve discoverability and access? And when something is not working, how can we productively solve the problem and strengthen our vendor relationships?

First, Chair Hilary Thorsen opened the 2015 meeting with a recap of our NCTPG history. While we have always focused on technical services, speakers have approached topics from various and surprising directions. Past meetings have even featured travelogues and practices from libraries abroad. A look back at the programs reflects our profession’s history, from wartime responsibilities to the many changes in technology and standards. We look forward to many more years of hearing from our colleagues.

Eli Windchy, VP, Consulting Services, at bepress is a history buff with a special interest in the Gold Rush. She likens searching through finding aids and citations to the meticulous sifting of rock to find valuable ore. Her work helping institutions build digital repositories means that users can go straight to the gold they want. In-house publishing and digital archives are making new demands on institutions. Windchy warns that “it doesn’t matter how beautiful a collection is if no one can find it.” Third-party tools can help smooth the process among all stakeholders and Windchy describes how she helps identify goals and best practices, and how to monitor and adjust as technology and needs change.

We all know Chronicle books for their creative topics and lush illustration. Phoung Mai, Metadata Coordinator, gave us the inside scoop on how those books and their attendant metadata come to be. Every book starts with an editor months or even years in advance. Metadata comes from many sources and changes many times up to and after it is delivered. Mai explains why the metadata does’ always match exactly the item in hand.

As electronic resources and databases become more complex, issues do the same. Linda Wobbe, Head, Collection Management, St. Mary’s College of California shared many inspiring examples of how she has worked with vendors to solve problems. She shows how to work up the chain and network to find the right source for answers, how to create new channels of communication, and, most importantly, how to strengthen relationships so that all parties benefit.

http://www.slideshare.net/nctpg1/slideshelf

The NCTPG Steering Committee hopes you will be a part of planning our 2015/2016 events. What topics do you want to hear about? What projects and ideas would you like to share? NCTPG is for all technical services in all types of information institutions. Your suggestions and comments are always welcome. Feel free to send an email and attend our monthly planning meetings, beginning in the fall.